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that critics say will deepen europe's dependence on russian gas. president putin was on hand as they began digging for the south stream pipeline. >> to augment supplies already flowing into germany. europe already receives 40% of its natural gas from russia. german investment and technology will be playing a key role in the project. >> it is a victory for russian president vladimir putin. they looked on as the first segments were welded together in western siberia. it is three weeks since bulgaria gave the go-ahead for the project. the last transit country to do so. >> this project has the political support of all partner countries. all have signed the contracts and taken their investment decisions. the pipeline will move huge amounts of gas. 63 billion cubic meters. >> that is how much gas sell stream is to move once it is completed by 2019. it is being routed from the black sea to italy and bypasses the current transit country, ukraine. moscow has argued with kiev over fees and gas prices for years. a feud that has often cut off gas supplies to western europe. >> south stream could soon
. >>> and the next phase of europe's crisis. which nations might find themselves split apart. i'll explain. >>> first, here is my take. arafat's body has been exhumed for investigation. bringing back memories of the unpredictable palestinian leader. the news broke at a time when a conventional wisdom has begun to take hold that the middle east today is much more dangerous, unstable, violent and anti-american than before. let's take a look at facts. in the 1980s the newly empowered radical islamic republic of iran unsettled the region with its promise to spread its revolution elsewhere. lebanon was in the midst of a bloody civil war. that engulfed itself and the palestinians and israel. iran and iraq fought a gruesome war with over one million casualties. hezbollah attacked u.s. armed forces directly forcing a humiliating withdrawal from lebanon. a cia station chief was tortured and killed, and u.s. secrets and interests compromised, and that was just in one decade. or consider those days from israel's point of view. during the 1980s, jerusalem faced well arms regimes. leading members of the rejection
without $1 trillion in stimulus. in europe the stimulus stopped working in 2012. in 2013 the stimulus is just not going to make an impact. these more wealthy people that will be spending will be hit by more taxes and they will slow down and i think that you're going to see the economy be much worse in 2013, but, you know, we may get more stimulus first in china and europe so i think it's going to be see-saw first half of 2013 and then i think the markets will head down seriously in the second half of 2013. >> but, again, to his point, the wealthy includes savers, both corporate and individuals, grandma and grand past the fed is killing them. >> killing them. >> so if we don't reball the equation, i don't think we'll make any progress. >> very, very important insights. gentlemen, appreciate it. >> happy new year. >> let's hope it's a happy one, guys. thank you. >>> meanwhile, dallas federal reserve president richard fisher saying congress should borrow a book from its playbook to strike a deal on the fiscal cliff. >> we get things done. we make a decision, and we proceed. >> we'll disc
-- europe. it is our goal and must remain our goal that greece at some point must shoulder its debts on its own and that the markets accept greece as a creditor. >> athens still has a long way to go before that happens. german lawmakers acknowledge the sacrifices greeks have already made and understand the ongoing protests. the necessary measures are hitting a lot of people hard. the new bailout package is worth 44 billion euros. germany will bear 730 million of that in the coming year. the opposition accuses the government of misleading the public about the true cost of helping greece. they say it will be necessary to restructure the debt. >> everyone knows that greece is bankrupt and that it cannot service such huge debt, and everyone knows that nothing will change in the long term and that the situation will only get worse with every year and every austerity package, and that is why the debt will have to be written off eventually, and that is going to be very expensive for germany. >> the opposition says a debt write off will have to happen, and say the finance minister is not coming cle
? it is africa. the route is from south america to africa, to europe. where is the new al qaeda organizations? where are they budding? where are they really being troublesome? witness benghazi, northern and western africa. that's where we fear al qaeda is taking root. what is the biggest fear? biggest fear is al qaeda northern africa and western after africa will become drug dealers. part of that cocaine movie in south america to europe getting the proceeds and thereby funding their terrorist activity. jump cut to this case involving these three men from maly. operating in maly and ghana. our d.n.a. informant contacts one of the local thugs who is said to have some association with al qaeda and says hey, guy, i have got a coke deal. i have got to get cocaine, tons of cocaine from south america here to maly and guana and south africa and up to europe. you al qaeda help me. you al qaeda will become part of my drug empire. >> operation. >> so what happens is the guy was not an actual drug dealer. he was a sting, a dia operator. the main contact point the guy thought to have some communication wi
's largest trading partner, europe's economy remains on prepares you footing despite several months of relative calm and there's a growing debate abt whher e u.k should lead the e.u. earlier this month we covered the "economist" magazine read "good-bye europe, look what happened when britain left the e.u. " i'm pleased to have george osborne back on this program and back at this table. >> thank you very much. >> rose: you're in new york city for a speech at the manhattan institute. >> i did that last night and had some meetings on wall street, seeing them there later. >> rose: so what's your message about the british economy to manhattan institute as well as the mayor and wall street? >> well, the basic message is itaiis on for business. if you want to come and invest in a country that is dealing with its problems, cutting its business taxes, providing opportunities for companys to go britain is the place. i think we're doing better. >> rose: you do? >> i certainly do. >> rose: the numbers don't look like that. >> well, actually, look at the u.k. compared to many western economies,
collapsed, places like russia, eastern europe. and for the rest of the world growth has basically meant increases in carbon. so the idea that comes from mainstream economics that you can decouple carbon from the size of the economy is not at all born out over the last 20 years. >> it's born out of germany. if someone can do it, it can be done, right? is that the answer? >> well, they've had very little slow gdp growth. and there they are an unusual economy. they've been able to export a lot of their -- big export surplus. >> everyone want to be germany. in the future, we will all be net exporters. >> can i make what is going to sound in this context like the naive case for growth and remind us why -- >> i want you to. >> why it's actually important? so, you know, let's stipulate yes, climate change is really important and, yes, juliet is absolutely right. it's really hard to do both at the same time but we have to be really careful to sort of -- it can be easy to say, let's forget about growth. all of these other things, children playing and being happy are so important. the reality is
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by climate change? >> our economy is mainly based on tourism. incidently, mainly from europe. there have been changes in the patterns of the fish, so our whole economy is now at risk. if it continues like this, the seychelles, the sea level rise will not be our biggest problem but we will become a failed state. >> you are in the indian ocean. place yourself geographically with other islands off the coast of africa that you are near. >> we are in the group of 115 islands east of kenya, north of madagascar. we cover a huge area of the southwestern indian ocean. we're at the full mercy of what happens in the ocean. we are ocean people. anything that affects oceans, whether through increased temperatures, acidification, which is a bigger threat to khor reece that morning temperatures. >> what happened with acidification? why is that a result of climate change? >> we are reaching the limits of carbon dioxide and water can take out of the air. we have abused the oceans as we have abused the forests. >> people here have said they joked that they found something with a label made in the u.s.a., and t
of the army? >> they are roughly 123,000 total. but pago is roughly the size of western europe. there are about 6000 deployed. no, that is the minusco, 6000 deployed in the east purdum i do not know the exact number of the congolese military in the east because it is a vast amount of area they are trying to cover with military troops. >> why is this such a big issue for the drc in order to be able to basically prevail in this situation? >> a slight provision -- revision. i think probably today, the m23 probably has up to 2000 troops. the sign -- i think he has pointed out the size of the congo, but i think it is important to graphically described the congo as a country that is as large as the eastern part of the united states from the atlantic to the mississippi. it is an enormous country, and since the split of sudan, it is geographically the largest in africa. the eastern congo is one of the most of a cold areas in which to operate -- one of the most difficult areas in which to operate. it is deeply for arrested in some places. and in -- is deeply forested. in some cases, a d
of war. two decades ago, with all eyes on europe, the united states prematurely celebrated victory over communism and an end to the cold war but in 1989, the same year the berlin wall fell, tanks roll spood tiananmen square crushing in a bloody massacre the hopes of the chinese people. while communism was gone in europe it was revitalized in the world's largest nation. pyongyang's missile launch awakens us to a fact that communism still casts a long shadow over asia. the nuclear proliveuation threaten not only our allies in the pacific but our own people as well. in asia the cold war never ended an the united states and south korean forces stand guard together on this last frontier. attempts to engage pyongyang over the past four years have been met with repeated prove cage. the kidnapping of two american journalists, repeated missile launches, one more nuclear test, the sinking of a south korean naval vessel with the loss of 46 lives and the shelling of a south korean island. how much more should we endure before we say enough is enough? sweet talking pyongyang only seems to inspire fu
off in europe it's made its way over here. how many times have we tossed away that broken coffee machine and bought a new one. inspiring others fix those broken household items. >> everything old is new again at the west seattle fix it collector. >> a group of that's like to get together and help each other fix whatever we own. >> from sewing machines to fans to lawn mowers, if it is broke they will try to fix it repair groups have flourished in europe and spreading to the united states. >> i like the idea of reusing something that has already had a life, already been built and created most of its environmental foot prints. >> members of the fix it collectors in brooklyn help people save the planet and a buck or two. >> throw away culture motivates a lot of us to come here and try to fight it. the economy definitely played a role. minute it breaks or the newest gadget comes out they have to get the new one and throw the old one away. it's expensive and what are we doing to the planet. >> so big in europe they attract up to half a million dollars in grants. not so here in the unit
to tuesday, showers will increase. where the rest of europe, we're looking at an ice conditions. non-profite, pro-people. >> welcome back. the top stories are now the zeroth, wounded dr. 21 of his colleagues were found shot dead in a remote tribal region. the officers were kidnapped on thursday. hundreds of suny muslims -- sunni muslims protesting that they're getting targeted for arrest. they have been protesting for days. prayer is being held in india for a gang rape victim who died from her injuries. her body was cremated after being flown back from singapore. six men are being charged with her murder. let's get more now on the security situation in pakistan. they say it is unlikely that the government would engage with talks with the taliban. >> basically, this is part of a concern of an organized campaign mounted by terrorists, whoever they are coming to demoralize the securities and also to defeat any attempt by the government to crack down on them. the second objective of this campaign seems to be putting fear and terror in the minds of common people live this is what we have
about eastern europe. you know what is great? neither of them said anything about this. a day has gone by and neither has responded. that makes me love serena. she does president president what to get lost in the nonsense. >> by the way, do you think she will say it is racist or just that it is funny. >> the fact that she didn't respond makes me think she is upset if she didn't defend her friend. i would say ninety% of the banter between me and my friends is making fun of each other. >> it makes fun of your stupid velvet jacket. >> you better believe it. and even cultural things that have come from somebody else. they are friends and she is making fun of her and i'm sure serena made fun of her. to call it racist is sad i think. >> bill, you actually dress the same way when you are escorting elderly men across town. >> their vision is bad, so they assume they are with a shapely female. that's when i take them for all they're worth. i think katherine -- caroline, sorry. maybe there is an old racist stereo type trope to what she was doing. i guarantee you she does not though that is an ol
. it could be another three to six months could go to a zoo in europe, australia, where wherever it might be, to keep the gene pool fresh. these animals are so rare we have to know exactly the breeding program. >> why are you not remotely scared of them? >> it's not a matter -- that's a good question. people ask me if i'm scared. if i find myself afraid or scared, that means i'm going the wrong thing. they know the animal very well, so i've been around them. i don't raise them like these guys do, but having raised tigers, my wife and i have raised, tigers, lions, leopards, everything in your 40 years of marriage. so you know cats when you do that much. see how he's licking me? if that were a full-grown tiger, piers, in less than three minutes he could lick me to the bone. that's how rough the tongue gets. sand paper like you wouldn't believe. >> when they're full sized, how many are left in the world? two to 400. that's all there is. >> two of the last remaining siberian tigers. >> in the zoo world we do quite well with them. in india, the bengal tiger, seen them take down a water buffalo in
or steroids is questionable. they have been looked at but from eastern europe you can't get those, they are readily available. >> without a doctor's prescription. >> without a doctor's prescription. >> mr. gimbel. >> the other issue is many athletes, pro, college, are going to health food store its and buying tons of muscles supplements which are not regulated. the fda does not regulate that industry, the survey that has been done randomly over the years, many of these products have had a g h and anabolic steroids in them. the fact is products are working and they are working so well, many professionals think something is not right. it needs to be regulated so we have a whole industry from energy drinks up to what you buy in these wars or on the internet that is not regulated and it is a real russian roulette when it comes to what these kids are buying which are probably getting more from the internet and these stores than they are from their doctors. >> you can't get h g h from 8 till. you can get anabolic steroids and there was a study of u.s. supplements in 2003 that 18.6% of s
. investors waiting to see what comes out of the fiscal cliff negotiations and in europe, a choppy start to the trading day. investors are waiting for the results of greece's bond buyback program occurs. joe has some of the big corporate news and this one is actually a global corporate story. >> hsbc. we're talking about paying $1.9 billion in the money lawnering lapses. a brirchb lender admitting to a breakdown of controls, in a statement announcing a deferred payment. yesterday standard chartered agreed to pay $27 million agreeing that it violates sanctions against iran and two other international companies. >> if you're an international bank and you prael without getting into this kind of trouble? >> no. >> can you actually operate without money laundering? >> i'm just saying, if you're going to be in business in all these types of markets, isn't this going to happen? >> aren't there sxwier countries that would be probably -- that it would stead if you don't want any business tale. >> was there a fascination in this country about whether you want to indict the whole institution or wha
people born into bondage and server to today and the victim of sex trafficking in western europe sold for $10 or more. these are the averages. the immediate economic consequence of this depreciation and cost is an increase in return on investment. particularly when tied to the fact you can exploit people in dozens of injuries. in the old law, roughly 20% average annual return on investment. today, 300% sein or more. but sex trafficking, it is more than that -- today, 300% or more. with sex trafficking, it is more than that. today, it could be a year or a couple of years. it is much shorter. centuries ago, you could legally own human beings. today you cannot actually legally own human beings. but people tend to exact the same kind of exploitation regardless. i have already used a lot of terms and had not really told you what they mean. the reason for that is some of these terms, most of them remain unclear. there is debate whether you talk to prosecutors, law enforcement, people in the international arena, as to what slavery means and forced labor and him and trafficking. it depends on
global answer so u.s. and europe and china are going to have different strategies. but the notion that in this region gas could be $2 to $3 or even $5 $6 for a million b.t.u.s shifts nuke fear this country out over a period of time. there may be a few new reactors built, but not many. >> rose: when do we have energy independence because of the online production of shale? >> here's what i would say, charlie. in other words, somebody who's smarter than i am should pick what's the right strategy. is it independence? is it security? is it something like that? but between canada, mexico, and the united states this region, the and a half a region, could be energy independent very soon. this region could probably be the most powerful or one of the most powerful energy producing regions in the world. and shale gas is just a game changer. it's just -- it's just a game changer is it a pan see yaw yah? no. but it opens up doors and that's something we should have high on the lists of things to do. >> rose: when you see that, what could disrupt that possibility of shale gas playing the role o
, including the religion of europe which we are talking about designating and recognizing the fact that there are some things called intangible heritage of the world. societies which have no rich culture did not thereby like the civilization and this is a policy which now unesco formally utterly appears to promote in his recognition and designation of a number of formally cultural aspects. the second one is of course the exponential increase in exchanges, cultural exchanges between the african world for incense and the european world. reparations. two may reparations are a truth. i have addressed the world bank and looking at reparations once and for all. why don't we get together and restore, return all of the artifacts from african continent and forget -- just returned everything. [applause] what bothers me about some of the exponents of reparations approach that they take is once you launch a new topic, once you launch it in public discourse you prepare for the ramifications of whatever position it is. you cannot align yourself and cannot pretend, in other words just try and sil
ham was the commander of europe. mike his decorations, the defense superior medal. the legion ofmeter with two oak leaf clusters, the bronze star medal and the joint service commendation medal. it's a privilege to have general ham with us here today, and on behalf of everyone assembled i'd like to thank him for his service to the country. please join me in welcoming general ham the floor and thanking the homeland policy institute for convening this event. general ham. [applause] >> i think you can probably abbreviate that introduction and say, i'm a pretty old soldier who has around for a long while. but one of the things you didn't hear in the introduction is any experience in africa. in fact that puts me in the category of most who have served in the united states military, because africa has not been a part of the world in which we have focused a lot of attention. certainly not during the majority of my career. so, when i was asked by secretary gates to -- if was interested in taking on this responsibility, i replied, frankly, with a great deal of enthusiasm. not knowing quite what
thim in europe and saw your grand daughter for the first time in there. >> governor, you know, we were and we wanted to see her while he was still in ethiopia and it didn't work out. we were going to land there and for security reasons we couldn't do it. i never staw marie until the awas in process and we were going back to the united states and my daughter and her husband. we met in germany and i saw this little girl and i knew immediately marie was going to be our grand daughter. i had no doubt about it i you hear about a match made in heaven. this was made in heaven. >> christmas time, and tell me what you are hoping happens for you this christmas? >> this christmas, i think i am really looked forward to putting up our nativity scene that my great grandfather maid. >> yes, sir he did. >> sounds like a wonderful family tradition. you i think it is interesting you didn't say you wanted for yourself but doing something as a family and honoring christ on his birth. it is obvious that the family that you have been placed into and chosen you is a very fram fam. senator, i just want to ask
to a zoo in europe or australia to keep them fresh. the thing is that these animals are are so rare we have to know what the greeding program would be. >> that is a good question, if i find myself afraid or scared these guys know the animal very well. if they lick you, it is like sandpaper. >> these are like two of the last remaining tigers. >> are remember something, when a tiger like this takes down a water buffalo in less than ten seconds, they are the only cats in the world, they can eat up to 30 or 40 pounds in one sitting. i can tell you that, they may be small, but they are quite big. in egypt in the towns. >> it looks like a sphynx. >> he is biting your arm. >> you saw how big the tigers were. >> look at the ears. you see why the pharoas. >> they represent royalty. what is unique about this cat. they can jump ten feet in the air. they blend so well in the grass. they lay down and watch for a bird. >> they can grab the bird. look at those ears. that is what kind of gives them away. what is next. what are these? >> they are amazing. this is the cirvil cat. this cat is a cat that is fr
, our former colleague, literally were wounded at about the same time in europe and were in the same hospital recovering from tremendously serious wounds. senator inouye, of course, later was awarded the congressional medal of honor for that. senator pryor was telling the story that when senator inouye was finally elected to congress he wrote senator dole a note and said, "i'm here. where are you?" because both of them, when they were recovering from their war wounds, had determined that one day they wanted to serve in the united states congress. inouye got here first. a few years ago senator inouye and senator ted stevens invited a number of us to go with them to china. it was quite an experience. senator stevens -- of course, another world war ii veteran -- had flown the first cargo play plane into what was then peking in 1974. and senator inouye was well-regarded in china for that service. and so the group of norse -- there must have been -- and so the group of norse -- ther of se must have been a dozen of us -- got together with the leaders of china. we were accorded every courte
't really control. i think what the u.s. and europe do and international financial institutions do is going to matter. morsi really cared about what the international community thinks about him. the brotherhood is very sensitive to that because they need outside support to get their economy back on track. so there is a real point of leverage there. so that -- if we can use that then i might actually be a little bit more optimistic. and but in terms of what the long-term goal is, izz -- islamists are islamists for a reason. they aren't going to become liberals. all this nice talk about post islamism is not realistic because we're talking about deeply religious conservative societies where large majorities admittedly don't vote on the basis of siria but they are sympathetic to the role of sharia and life. and democracy can empower those elements of society that can push society further tore the right and that's not just egypt we see that in other democracies whether in hungary, israel. it's not a unique thing today. islamist doss want to have a more islamically infused egypt and that is somet
and jimmy went to ethiopia, they were able to get marie there, but you met them in europe and saw your granddaughter for the first time there. tell me about that moment. >> yeah. well, governor, you know, we wanted to see her while she was still in ethiopia and didn't work out. we were going to land and couldn't for security reasons, couldn't do it. i never saw marie until as you said the adoption was in process and we were going back to the united states and my daughter and her husband, we met in germany. and i saw this little girl and i knew immediately when i saw her, marie was going to be our granddaughter, you i had no doubt about it and it's one of these things that it's just, you know, you hear about a match made in heaven, well, this was made in heaven. >> all right, marie, i've got to ask you, it's christmas time. tell me what you're hoping happens for you this christmas. >> this christmas, i think i'm really looking forward to putting up our nativity scene that my great grandfather made. >> he actually made it. >> yes, sir, he did. sounds like a wonderful tradition. and it's
their capabilities so they can provide for their own security. in latin america, africa, europe, and elsewhere. the past decade of war has reinforced the less than that one of the most effective ways to address long-term security challenges is to help build the capabilities of our allies. we have seen its approach with our counterinsurgency campaigns in iraq and afghanistan and our counter-terrorism efforts in yemen and somalia. we are expanding our security force assistance to a wider range of partners, in order to address a broader range of security challenges. in the asia-pacific, the middle east, and europe, africa, and latin america 3 to implement this area of strategy, the services are retaining the security cooperation capabilities we have honed over a decade of war and making investments in regional expertise. for example, for the army's new regionally aligned for grade a g brigade structure, they are able to engage on a regionally aligned brigade structure, they are able to engage on a rotational basis. to cut through the bureacracy and red tape to provide assistance. i visited countr
to a zoo in australia, europe, they are to keep them fresh the thing is they are so rare that we have to know exactly what the breeding program will be for the creature. >> why are you not remotely scared of them? sgles that's a good question. if i find myself afraid or scared that means i'm doing the wrong thing. these guys know the animal very well. i have been around them. i don't raise them like they do. but my wife and i raised tigers, lions, leopards and you know cats when you do that much. that tongue how he is lick mega. if that were a full-grown tiger he could lick my arm to the bone. that's how rough the tongue becomes. like sand paper beyond what you have ever seen. >> how many are there left in the world. >> 200 to 400. >> that's all there is. >> yes. >> this is like two of the last remaining siberian tigers. >> in the zoo world we do well with them. when a tiger takes down -- in india, i have seen a tiger take down a water buffalo down in under ten minutes and only cats in the world that when they eat up to 30, 40 pounds in one sitting and their stomachs can explode. most
an extensive traveler, works in africa, africa, south and east asia, europe and of course the middle east. by far the largest part of her work has been as an author, both acknowledged and if i may put it this way is a quiet partner. she has in either way more than 60 books to her credit and a number of genres, poetry, fiction, both adult and children's and a book of an adult romantic chirla g. if i remember craig -- correctly and tales of the king. a lot of her work has been nonfiction and that too has covered a variety of subjects. some of her nonfiction has dealt with the issue of single motherhood. but a good deal is still somehow or other with the issue of religion and the life of politics and social life. this is including the book, difficulty journalists frequently have and probably understanding religion as a motive in offense. is called blind spot, done together with her birder amundsen and my colleague who is here today, coal martial. it was published and won several literary prizes. it has also included work on a book entitled a table in the presence which was written by lieut
coming from eastern europe and has the project blitz free is being led by a mysterious russian attacker and many targeted may not even realize it. >> you're someone with a substantial amount of money in your account. you logon one day and have a smaller amount than before but you've been hacked. that could happen to thousands of americans this coming spring. a new report says some of america's biggest banks, 30 of them, are at risk of a master cyber attack that could siphon millions of dollars from unsuspecting customers. >> we've found to date 3 and 500 devices that have been infected within the u.s. pat calhoon mcafee won't name the individual bank but account holders in many of the large mainstream banks are targeted. mcafee says this attack is from a cyber gag with a handle. >> he's trying to build attackers to expand the scope of the project. so that's the first thing. but how it's actually executed in the project itself is that he has computers that are basically monitoring and controlling all of these infected devices. >> calhoon says the attackers are going after individuals who
japanese americans had the highest casualsed in europe and the most tech crated in the history of the ute. then he turned and said i think the beneficiaries of the senator from illinois and the dream act will do the same. it was the type of short statement which captured in a few words his life, his sacrifice, what he had proven, by risking his life for this country. the reason we honor him. this morning. i close by saying two things. first, i think senator talked about his colleague of so many years and put it in a few years. he said on the floor last night, tomorrow willwill be the first day since hawaii became a state in 1959 that dane knew way will not be representing us. he really worked to shape ohio and this country. he said, you'll be missed in washington, as much as in hawaii. rays in peace, senator inouye. that summarizes how much he has meant to his and how much he has meant to america. hi last word, aloha, as senator reid said so appropriate. this kind and gentle american hero would leave with a greeting of love for everybody else. that was his life. i yield the floor. >> sena
in europe, also known as the helsinki commission, which i cochair -- which senator cardin cochairs, during senate consideration of h.r. 6156. the presiding officer: without objection, so ordered. mr. wicker: thank you, mr. president. and, again, i come to the floor today to support this bill. it has is very important two-fold purpose. it promotes normal trade relations with russia, and at the same time the legislation insists that the russian government adhere to the rule of law. it does so by putting consequences in place for those in russia who abusive human rights, basic human rights. granting pntr to russia is a big win for americans. if congress does not act, american workers, including millions employed by small businesses, stand to lose out to foreign competitors as russia opens its market as a new member of the world trade organization. many in my home state of mississippi and around the country deserve to benefit from increased trade that this new relationship would bring. more jobs and greater economic growth are our potential rewards here in the united states. last year, mississ
europe and asia in terms of our -- in terms of our national natural gas. but it creates a better economy, high revenues that reduces the debt. >> senator, the same question to you. i'm wondering, this headline recently predicting that we're going to be -- the united states could be producing more oil than saudi arabia beginning in 2020. i mean, this is something almost unimagined 10 years ago. what is the role of the federal government from here on out, given that? >> i think the role of the federal government is to do things that encourage exactly that result and to follow up a little bit on the question of fiscal cliff, part of the way that you saw this fiscal problem issue grow our relative position in the economy relative to everybody else's. one of our big problems right now is the percentage of government spending is way more than it should be relative to total g.d.p. and part of that is because you don't have the growth in g.d.p. that the right kind of energy policies would produce. if there's an easier formula ever in the history of economics than more american energy equals more
, troops were returning home from europe and the pacific after world war ii. the joy of their return was tempered by public health concerns about what might be arriving with them. would their homecoming also reintroduce diseases that had been erased from the national scene? in the southeastern part of the united states, up until well into the 20th century, this was an area that had malaria. there was a lot of concern that as soldiers returned from areas, particularly in the pacific, which were high-incidence areas for malaria, that as they came back to military bases in the southeast, that there was a possibility that they would reintroduce malaria into the mosquito populations around those military bases, and so a little unit was established in atlanta, being that it was the largest city in the southeast, to make sure that those mosquito populations were kept under control around the military bases, so that malaria wouldn't come back in this part of the country. and the way you control it, and the way we did in this country, was you got to get rid of the mosquito vector. that takes
of the neighbors of syria and our allies in europe, some of which have now been ahead of us, that we will focus in on this immediate really potentially disastrous threat of chemical and biological weapons. >> you said a moment ago that iran is our most dangerous enemy. if so, how far should we be willing to go to prevent iran from acquiring nuclear weapons? >> i just echo what everybody said. it's unacceptable for us to allow -- to become a nuclear state. containment is not an acceptable alternative. i think that is absolutely right. it changes the balance of power in the middle east. some of our allies to begin to accommodate. and it's a threat to most of the rest of the world. the sanctions, unprecedented so i think we have to the make sure that our threat of military actions, if they don't take down their nuclear equipment is credible. i'm still not sure it is. they have to believe that the u.s. will use our immense power to the civil the program if they don't. >> make one comment directly pertaining to the overall theme here. starting a long time ago, years ago our sanctions regime should n
into bondage and servitude today. you can have a victim of sex trafficking in western europe. the immediate economic consequence of this, appreciation and cost, it is an increase in return on investment, particularly when tied to the fact that you can exploit people in dozens of industries. the old world, calculated, roughly 15% or 20% return on investment. today, 300% or 400%. it might be well beyond that. the duration of exploitation has changed. because of a large capital investments and the slow return, you could maintain and exploit people across the lifetimes. today, six months, one year, a couple years, it is much shorter. of course, very importantly, centuries ago, you could legally own human being is. today, you cannot actually legally own human believe -- beings. i have already used a lot of terms, slavery, human trafficking, and i have not told you what they mean. the reason for that is that some of these terms, most of these terms remain unclear. there's a lot of debate whether you talk to prosecutors, law enforcement, people in the international arena as to what slavery means.
, in europe, in africa, in the caribbean, and in america, especially in america where it had the impact of radicalizing the abolitionist movement, and by that i mean that more and more people began to recognize that the resistance of enslaved people was crucial to abolition. they began during the time of the rebellion to quote a famous line from lord byron. this is repeated again and again and again running all the way up to the civil war, and that line was those who would be free must themselves strike the first blow. in other words, action from below can be a trigger. this had a very dramatic impact op a lot of leading african-american intellectuals like henry highland-garnett, frederick douglass and had a big effect on a man named john brown who wanted to strike the first blow at harpers ferry. i guess this is the final thought i leave you with. one of the most remarkable things about movements from below is that they are unpredictable. you never know when they are going to arise or how. these -- these things that rise up, these demands for justice, these demands for equality, these
has functioned for years as an easy-to-enter gateway into the rest of europe. and one that by all accounts has made a mess of its immigration system. many migrants are illegal: largely tolerated in good times, but increasingly for greeks, no more. >> ( translated ): i don't have a problem with immigrants in general. but i have a problem with those who come here and don't find work and they resort to crime. >> brown: and has this been getting worse? >> everyday it's getting worse. >> brown: this man said he opposes violence against immigrants. but others clearly feel differently and the anti- immigrant sentiment helps explain the rise of the golden dawn party, which won 18 seats in parliament in the last election and has seen its popularity grow further in more recent polls to third among all parties. golden dawn describes itself as greek nationalists. but, with its swastika-like symbol, its rhetoric and street tactics, it's widely seen as neo-nazi. and its supporters have become more brazen in carrying out physical attacks on migrants, including this one caught on camera in a mark
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